|||

working at speed

Below is a quote from musician Thom Yorke in an interview he did with NPRs Bob Boilen in February 2008. It comes in at 9:40min into the interview.

Yorke: His [producer Nigel Godrich] thing is always … is always … speed.

Boilen: What do you mean?

Yorke: If you drag to a halt … if you’re sitting there, as happens occasionally — or more than occasionally — you spend hours cutting and chopping and blah blah blah … it’s very dull you know. Whereas … it is … and if things grind to a halt and the energy of the piece that you’re working on is dead … you know … and he’s really good at basically stopping that from happening … and keeping things moving because, essentially, like any creative process, you can get sucked into it and you’re ceasing to be — as you said — open to what’s happening. Cease to be prepared to be surprised or whatever, you know?

I recognise a tendency in my own work to get bogged down in the minutiae of making, and I like the idea that working quickly might help in remaining open to surprise.

Up next heart places promoting ideas I’m reading A Year with Swollen Appendices: Brian Eno’s Diary1 and it’s full of delicate treasures and everyday written doodles. It’s also creating
Latest posts loneliness, uncertainty and boredom better left unsaid 120fps le mani before they love sneaky aspects of group deliberation informational heartbeats what gordon parks saw rhoneisms ideology mean world syndrome dream baby dream and joy xkcd hug count the families if then else nobody the competency model the art of reading question your teaspoons midlifing how to receive updates chasing elvis how a conversation is going to go uncertainty and continuous updating how to disagree midlifing aroha atkinson hyperlegible font secret history of our enemies popcorn popping long form documents