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rhythms of performance

I am currently running (walking?) an MA level module called Dance Practice as Research”. As part of the early stages of their research, I thought it might be useful for the students to try and write a brief artist’s statement. This has followed a series of short conversations (with each other, with themselves — “self-interviews” — http://www.everybodystoolbox.net/?q=node/43)

The task was shared as I’d like you to prepare and share (love a rhyme) an”Artist’s statement” for this blog. It should be a concerted effort to write clearly about your choreographic/performative research interests. Be succinct (3-4 sentences ought to do it).”

The students will start posting in the next couple of days and you can take a look here: http://dpar-autumn2010.posterous.com

Here’s mine:

As a dancer and choreographer, I’m interested in exploring the psychology of human experience, and particularly ideas related to memory, time and death. I try and keep the audience-performer relationship in the very foreground of my projects. I’ve developed a cross-disciplinary (and highly collaborative) practice — words, movement, mediated image — and am curious how these different activities alter the rhythms of performance, and also the interpretative experiences of audiences.

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